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place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayl emplo russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayemploye russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todaymployee russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayployee a is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayloyee i is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayoyee i is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayyee i f still a good place to in more or less friendly? >> there is no compare ton. when mr. putin came in, he changed the tax code which made a huge difference.ie ton. when mr. putin came in, he changed the tax code which made a huge difference. it was 13% flat tax, corporation tax 24% and suddenly you couldn't invest in companies because could you understand what was in the financials of the company. so accounting firms g
that may be hoarding cash to protect themselves in this uncertain environment but does that mean, likely, they're going to spend that cash or put it to work once we get a resolution of the fiscal cliff? >> it all depends on how it gets resolved. if obama gets his way, and we get big tax increases on small businesses, but also increased double taxation of dividends and capital gains, we'll have a less friendly economic environment for investment to car inside the united states. and that would mean an incentive for companies not to conduct business here. maybe to expand their branchs and their operations overseas. yes, there's the short-term uncertainty in the fiscal cliff that's hurting, but then i actually agree with michael. it's long-term fundamentals that matter. our government is just too much of a burden. >> steve, what's at stake here? >> i want to talk about two scientists from two different fields. one is pav lolov. a dog would salivate when you put food in hem. ed prescott took that idea and said, you know what, when companies spend, they spend after and during recessions when t
at grocery stores or imposed fees for using them. at issue is their effect on the environment. >> reporter: you won't find blastic bags at the checkout counter at bob's market in southern california. they are banned in 50 cities and counties across the state. francine shops with her own reusable bag and wants more communities to enforce similar bans. >> if they went through a garbage dump or a trash site and saw what was going on they would think twice about it. >> reporter: supporters of the ban say plastic bags crowd land fills, pollute streets and waterways and threaten marine life. where plastic is banned like here in santa monica, stores go through piles of paper bags. those also take a toll on the environment but about 50% do get recycled. that's compared to about 5% of plastic bags. but manufacturers say banning the bags is unfair. >> the amount of litter nationally that plastic bags produce is less than half of 1%. >> reporter: marine scientis is with the advocacy group heal the bay and says in los angeles plastic bags make up closer to 25%. >> litter on the streets gets washed thr
heidi, the environment clearly a global challenge, clearly a part of the foreign policy. how does it fit into the economic statecraft? >> it fits into a lot of different things the state department is working on. what we as a relatively new office of seven months and only a few people have been working on are much more than the sort of geographic priorities that the secretary has highlighted, so i probably wouldn't be the best person to speak to this department with a whole host of environmental issues. a lot more time on the year autozone and the relationship and then there's a little bit of a list from the economic analysis perspective that we tend to spend most of our time on. >> all of the subjects but maybe everybody else would like a chance to do that, too. questions? i think there is a microphone here. is there another mic? going once -- if people don't have questions i will ask them. okay. >> the council of the land that. one of the things that we observed both in the atlanta environment and looking at the global companies that has to do with our competitive edge advantage in col
environment will remain unfavorable. in addition, the committee believes that the effective supply capacity of the economy is likely to continue to grow slowly over the forecast period. in october, cpi inflation picked up to 2.7%, partly as a result of higher university tuition fees. the committee's best collective judgment of the outlook for cpi inflation is summarized in chart 3 on page 8 of the report and is based on the same assumptions about monetary policy as chart 1. inflation is likely to remain above target for the first part of the forecast period and is higher than in august reflecting recent outturns and the announcement of large increases in household energy prices. further declines in inflation not being checked by price increases in sectors where market influences are weak. the rising student tuition fees alone added over not .3 percentage points to yesterday's inflation figure and do pestic gas and electricity prices are raising faster than wholesale energy prices. such factors are pushing inflation -- >> the point mervyn king is making there that part of the reason inflatio
. >>> environment 58 researchers from southeast asia are sounding the alarm over marine pollution. they gathered in jakarta to share their research into the state of local seas. the indonesian government organized the seminar with the japan sociy fo the pmoti of science. about 150 people attended. japanese researchers say they found plastic garbage last year in the stomach of a seal of indones indonesia's island. they say the garbage can easily accumulate on the deep sea floor as currents are weak. some researchers say they found metals in the seabed in the manila bay and others reported finding chemicals in the java sea much indonesia. >>> emerging economic powers stilltruggling with poverty. emboldened citizens demanding democracy, the threat of violence, the push for peace, the shadow of conflict. get news and insight on south and southeast asia every weekday live from bangkok, only on nhk world "newsline". >>> the mayor of an island in the east china sea is trying to diffuse a dispute over fishing rights. he is visiting taiwan to talk about access to waters off the senkaku islands. he admini
to return profits in 2013, but high fuel costs and a poor economic environment continued to weigh on profits. air berlin is not alone in going through some turbulence. this is not a great time for europe's airlines. >> many are struggling to stay in business. here's a look at the litany of problems they face. >> scandinavian airline sas is fighting for survival. the carrier has not turned a profit in five years. it is not alone. just last week, spain's flagship carrier said it would cut nearly a quarter of its work force in an effort to remain competitive. sas alone plans to cut more than 1/3 of its 15,000 employees. air france is looking to reduce staff to 45,000 workers. and germany's lufthansa is also in the midst of a painful cost- cutting program. earlier this week, the airline struck a deal with unions to raise cabin crew pay in exchange for no strikes over the christmas holidays. >> coming up, we've got some sports news for you. >> first, some other stories making news around the world. three demonstrators have vented their anger at a german consul. he was heading for a meeting with l
at a normal interest rate, i'm a guy that wants to go 50/50 bond equities, are you saying in this environment i should be 75 equities, 25 bonds because of the risk? >> yeah, i think the problem is nobody is 50/50. today people are sitting at 80% this bonds. 10% quit tis and a little bit of cash. here's the big issue. americans need to retire. 75% of them have already said they don't have enough money. 40% said they'll never have enough money. so they're funding their lon term liability which is retirement 15 years, on average 58 years old, and they're funding it with a security that's at the end of its peak cycle. so usual getting zero rate of return and you're saying i'll fund the liability by an investment that i'm guaranteed to lose money in. the world is more complicated. it's not 50 stock and 50 bond. so you have to say i need to start to move into a more balanced portfolio. the big problem people have is they think it's a binary switch. i go from stocks to bonds. maybe risky people and speculate tors do that. but it means i need to start to lessen my bond position, because more balanced
should be positioning your portfolio in this environment of uncertainty. he manages more than $14 billion for westfield capital. and will, i know you've got interesting thoughts about what's working right now and what people should be doing. which is great, we hear from a lot of people who freeze up at this point, keep things in cash. but you're looking specifically at stocks that might benefit from things like an improvement in the housing industry, which is something we heard yesterday from home depot. >> yeah, exactly. i think the one big difference with the debt ceiling negotiation, for example, the republicans had an incentive to make the current administration look bad because they're trying to win an election, right? well, now with the election over, i think there's an incentive for them not to obstruct. and so i do think something will get done. it'll most likely be a minor deal to buy some time and maybe we get a major deal in 2013. but at the end of the day, i think there'll be some fiscal drag in the first half of '13. rather than sitting cash where you get zero, what can you d
such as protection of the environment as well as narrowing the gap between rich and poor. but as i said, these are very carefully worded. especially this year. no one wants to say something that is too aggressive or too reformist. because of course there is a pretty powerful group that are against pro market reforms. there are some that benefit, some leaders especially that benefit from the status quo like the officials of state owned enterprises which enjoy some advantages in the form of easier access to loan and less competition. >> if i could ask whether it really matters if the way that we read the tea leaves if it's the reformers or the conservatives here who have more influence in terms of this transition. what he he's the latest view one impact it will have? >> tons of speculation ahead of the roll out on thursday. it's likely going to be a mix of both some reformerses and some conservatives, but you're right in the sense it may not matter in the short term, but long term it will have an impact because some analysts say that the hu jintao administration on the way out did not do
process and with this going on, we will have very difficult environment for investment and growth for the euro area to go ahead. so without clarity where the euro area goes, the environment will be quite difficult. p. >> okay. thanks very much for that. now, he mentioned weakness in europe. that's extending to the u.s. we are seeing futures trying to rebond here, but again, we saw levels of decline in the range of 1.3 to 1.5 yesterday for the major bourses. this morning we're really only getting about 25 points in rebound for the dow jones industrial average. which is thousand sitting at 12,559. the nasdaq and s&p are also showing a little about the of a r rebit of a rebound, but not huge moves. investors digest the growth tigs or lack thereof. spain is trying to move to the up side adding almost 0.3%, so a little better than last time we checked in. the other three down. as we're learning about the slowing of the german economy and the ftse 100, shedding 0.4%, below the 5700 mark. now, we are seeing in the uk a little better, but broadly speaking a mixed picture. we started off s
back really. i'm just focused on trying to figure out what to do in this environment like i would be in any which brings us to the stock market. already sending a message to washington perhaps about the necessity of a deal on the fiscal cliff. six out of the last seven sessions have been negative. down more than 5% on fears about it but you've been bringing up the market action similarity to a certain extent to 20 plus years ago. a year ago let's not forget we were starting to deal with europe. it did not end until we got ltro, long-term refinancing operations from ecb that said we're going to -- it's not going to go bankrupt today. that's when we were watching italy above 7%. today those ten-year yields up 4.5, 4.6. >> talk about how italy has come. the economy is better than other countries. northern part of italy is increasing industrial production. that's impressive. they never gave up. italian banks some are happy with no problems funding. the reason i go back which is of the analogy why i go back that far. that's a tuesday, wednesday thing in europe. you focus on when ecb me
and the baby. and there's nothing more important than a nurturing environment with a coach and some dedicated cheerleaders get you through some of the humps. >> among the new recommendations help -- >>> this weekend, a quarter of the nfl quarterbacks who took the field left with concussions. doctors, trainers and coaches have started paying closer attention to the cumulative brain injuries sustained from concussion and what they mean not just for the pros but for our kids. passionate about staying in the game. football is america's sport. and christian stevenson's 12- year-old son is enamored with it. >> he gets up two hours before practice, he's got his uniform on. he can't walk when he gets off the practice field because they've worked him so hard but he's smiling. >> her experience has been far different. after suffering repeated concussions playing the game he loved, he knew it was time to quit. >> my memory is still kind of off. >> because of growing concerns that some of the damage from repeated concussions doesn't go away, one leading boston researcher proposed very tough guidelines fo
the environment. secondly, you talk at one point about the european parliament being an important partner for you and all the crisis related issues. white and has the fiscal pack gotten to the point that it has? when it's already clear that has two points that are conflicting with e.u. law in material and in formal terms, and that hasn't been regulated the european level. and implementation of the pact by the commission, well, how can we go along with that if the parliament is going to be excluded from that? you will have to deal with that on the first of the first. that is to come into force, but it will be impossible to implement it so how are you going to reconcile that contradiction? thank you. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: chancellor, let me thank you very much for coming in today. i think it's been an interesting discussion. with certain heard a lot of political rhetoric. wavered not much economic reality from some members but that we are. we're used to it in this chamber. the october revolution was something to be celebrated, but chance of, i wish you well in a meeting with my
cannon. the cost of the debt service in that environment will be enormous. investors and retirees with social security and state debt will see their portfolios lose value. home buyers will see the cost of mortgages to rise and home owners will likely see the price of their homes fall. as few buyers qualify for these mortgages. the government could have its back to the wall at that point and we would be forced to embrace more drastic steps to ensure fiscal balance of the government does not take action now. why hasn't the government taken action? let's be candid -- putting aside the rhetoric -- rhetoric and the possible last two weeks, the behavior in washington in recent years confirms we have lost the ability to compromise. politicians who attempt to move to the center are set upon by their own side. one size faces continuing pressures never allowing a cent of spending cuts and there's a call countervailing opinion from the others as a reserve -- the other side that does not want a tax increase. each side of states the other side cannot win no matter what the consequences. the va
. that is a real scoop in an environment where there are no deals, david brought us a very good scoop. >> that's why you haven't participated in any of this. there are no other deals. this was the only one. >> not many needles in the hay stack. >> david found the only one. thank you for bringing it here, david. boyd jeffries name. >> what was it exposure in europe? >> egan had all sorts of rhymes and reasons for that company falling apart. >> we'll talk about shipping right now, from i-phones to apparel, cnbc's senior talent producer, lori ann larocco, our staff, incredible producer and her book "dynasties of the sea," and lori ann, reading through this, we know how important shipping is, we talk about it every day but there were things i didn't realize how much of the things in our homes are brought to us from ships. >> 92% of everything in a household has been on a ship and ever since superstorm sandy we've all realized how important shipping is as we're all going through this gasoline crisis. it's really amazing in terms of the wide breadth that the shipping industry has on the economy. >>
are being formed today in an environment that's much, much more radical than was the case nearly a decade earlier. i think there are some important lessons that the u.s. can learn from iraq and from afghanistan and from what's taking place there. but again the thing i would take away and the thing i would really stress to people is that this is not a war that the u.s. can win on its own. it's very -- it's very tempting for the u.s. to see a problem and to want to go in and solve it all the way. and i think there has to be a realization that sometimes being so pro active and carrying out so -- proactive and carrying out so many missile strikes and drone strikes can actually have a negative impact. >> ibrahim, did you want to chime in on this one? >> well, i didn't hear the question. i have a hard time hearing from the audience. but what greg said made sense to me so thank you. [laughter] >> i'm sorry. i'll start repeating the question to make sure we can get it. >> thank you. >> in the back. >> thank you. good morning. my name is giancarlo gonzalez with talk radio service. yemeni president
whether we have to compete. you have to benchmark what your tax environment, your regulatory environment, your energy costs. the good news is in terms of getting manufacturing, we're still the world's largest market. when global investors take a look at the u.s., and canada's rate is 15% and hours is 35%, where are you going to site your plant? $1.75 trillion a year, a number that is larger than all but 80 economies in the world. it is not particularly attractive. when this administration refuses to utilize our domestic energy resources, refuses the keystone pipeline which would bring jobs and energy down to america, they reject that. that is not attractive in terms of global investment and job creation. the caller also talked about what caused the deficit then been a lot of charts and graphs dispel some myths. over four years, the total deficit was 5000 $92 billion. the taxes on the wealthy over that same time was $136 billion. all other americans was $544 billion. total cost of the bush tax cuts and the wars was about $1.30 trillion which means 75% of the deficit was caused by other sp
into these environments which are very, very important places to be, and debate our core value, not just explained them, not just lecture, but actually debate our greatest strengths i think will be stronger. so that was one of the ways we really tried to do that. and also to take the benefit of the folks who were there in the field, give information as to who was the important audiences for the bbg. >> can i just clarify one thing? when i said more guidance from foreign policy leadership for the bbg, i certainly didn't mean that the bbg should forsake or distort or anyway jeopardize the journalistic values. very, very important. but for example, the bbg's, the board of governors decide where the assets are allocated. in other words, if the governors decide we're going to put all the money into india, it's their decision rather than the part of the more strategic decision-making process. congress would get involved if all the money went to one country. >> do you think? [laughter] >> there's certain country's bbg would like to get rid of that congress wouldn't allow and that sort of thing. but i'm guessi
this, but there is support like this, for this environment. i think it will desolve because there's resistance. >> trevor, i feel when you talk about political operatives on both sides and fundraisers on both sides, and donors, there's a strong word, but there's a self-hating quality to people in the system who feel trapped. i mean this thing will just go on and they will play and get used to it. is that what's sustaining this? what keeps it going? >> well, during the course of the campaign, i had a chance to talk to a range of major republican donors, and even they, i mean, i say "even they" because republicans were more interested in the super pacs, the party embraced them, and citizens united, but romney donors said this is terrible. i don't want to write an up limited check. this is not our the president ought to get selectedded, and we need to talk about this after the election. you know, now eng one of the thing -- i think i'll be doing is circling around so are you interested in changing the system? if you look at it, even the candidates are prisoners of this, not necessari
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)